FALSE FACTS ABOUT ICE CREAM

'Ice creams are sweets and are not nourishing', 'ice creams give you a sore throat', 'eating ice cream causes headaches'... Who hasn't heard statements like these at one time or another? Discover the facts that refute some of these false ideas associated with eating ice cream

ICE CREAMS ARE SWEETS, THEY AREN'T NOURISHING AND THEY MAKE YOU FAT
Ice creams have significant quantities of a number of nutrients, such as protein, calcium or vitamin B. And it can't be said that they're fattening because that depends on the rest of our diet. The average content of a unit or serving of ice cream has fewer calories than a serving of cake, comparable to a serving of cheese and, obviously, more than a piece of fruit.
ICE CREAMS HAVE TOO MUCH SUGAR
The body needs a certain amount of sugar for energy. A reasonable sugar content in our daily diet is 10%; the sugar in an ice cream is about 4-6% (assuming a total calorie intake of 2000 calories).
ICE CREAMS CAUSE TOOTH DECAY
Ice cream has sugar but that isn't the only cause of tooth decay; there are many other factors as well. Furthermore, since it doesn't spend much time in our mouth and induces salivation, it's not a significant cause of tooth decay if we look after our oral hygiene.
ICE CREAMS CAUSE HEADACHES
Stimulation of the palate by cold, especially over a prolonged period, may cause headache. However, a study* has shown that eating ice cream is not a significant factor and, therefore, cannot be considered a food particularly likely to cause headaches. As a precaution, it is enough to avoid prolonged contact of the ice cream with the back of the palate.

*Study published by the Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona, by the team led by Abel Mariné (Director of the Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Barcelona)
ICE CREAMS IRRITATE THE THROAT AND INTERFERE WITH DIGESTION
By the time ice cream comes into contact with the pharynx, its temperature has already increased. Temperatures below 28ºC are rarely recorded under the tongue. So it cannot be said that ice creams irritate the throat. As regards digestion, ice cream warms up as it travels toward the stomach, so it can't have any harmful effect there either. But we can't say the same about cold drinks. As they are swallowed so quickly, there's no time for them to warm up.
DIABETICS CAN'T EAT ICE CREAM
In ice creams with lactose, as the sugar lactose is supplied together with fats, and, in some cases, also with fibre, such as nuts, or fruit pulp, the hyperglycaemia produced is less compared with other sweet products. So occasionally, and always in moderation, they can be eaten by diabetics. They can also eat ‘sugar-free’ varieties with artificial sweeteners, which avoids the problem altogether.

Source: White Paper on Ice Cream, written by Professors of Nutrition and Food Science at the University of Barcelona (Spain)

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